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Ask us to install a zebra crossing or pedestrian island

Ask us to install a zebra crossing or pedestrian island

Ask us to install a zebra crossing or pedestrian island, and find out what other requests we’ve had to install them.

Zebra crossings and pedestrian islands help people cross the road.

Zebra crossings

Zebra crossings are made up of white stripes painted on the road in the crossing area, and flashing yellow lights on black and white striped poles at both sides of the road.

The kerbs are dropped at both ends of the crossing where the pavement slopes towards the road.

Drivers must stop when they see a pedestrian waiting at the edge of a zebra crossing, to let them cross the road.

Where we use zebra crossings

We tend to use zebra crossings on local roads that join main roads, where cars drive relatively slowly and there isn’t much traffic. They’re cheaper to install and cost less to maintain than traffic light crossings.

We don’t tend to use zebra crossings on roads with higher speed limits.

Pedestrian islands

Pedestrian islands are short sections of pavement between two lanes. There’s usually tactile paving where the pavement slopes towards the road and in the island.

Drivers don’t have to stop when they see a pedestrian waiting at the edge of a pedestrian refuge island.

Where we use pedestrian islands

We tend to use pedestrian islands on busy roads where there are usually few pedestrians, and zebra crossings or traffic lights aren’t suitable.

We may use pedestrian islands on quieter roads, depending on:

  • how many pedestrians there are
  • what the traffic speeds are like

Ask us to install a zebra crossing or pedestrian island

To ask for a zebra crossing or pedestrian island, use the ask for a change to a road form.

Ask for a change to a road

You can also check if someone else has asked for one in the same spot.

What happens next

We’ll record your request and consider it when we decide which requests to go ahead with. This will depend on different things, including:

  • whether we think the area needs it
  • the cost
  • how it might affect traffic in the area

If we agree to your request, there will be a consultation and public advertisement before we can go ahead with the installation.

The public advertisement involves posting:

  • notices on site telling people of the suggested change
  • an advert in the local press inviting comments or objections

The consultation and public advertisement can take six months or longer.