Publishing fees and scheme information

Publishing fees and scheme information

What information you need to display in your premises and publish on your website, how you need to do this, what happens if you don’t.

If you’re a letting agent, Chapter 3 of The Consumer Rights Act 2015 (as amended by the Tenant Fees Act 2019) states you must publish:

  • the list of relevant fees you charge landlords and tenants 
  • with the list of fees, details of the client money protection scheme you belong to, if you’re required to be a member of one
  • with the list of fees, details of the redress scheme you belong to 

List of Fees

As a letting agent, you must: 

  • publish the fees you charge landlords in connection with the letting agency or property management work you do for them
  • publish any permitted payments that may be required from tenants  

Your list of fees must be:

  • displayed at all your business premises where you have face to face contact with customers and clients
  • displayed in a place where your customers and clients are likely to see it
  • published on your website
  • published on any third-party website, for example if you use a property portal to market your properties, where the property is in England. If this is not possible, you must have a link to your own website, where the information is. 

The fees must be:

  • described in enough detail that the landlord or tenant knows what they’re for or what service is to be provided
  • clear on whether the fee is per tenant or per property
  • inclusive of any tax: if you cannot determine this in advance, you should explain how you’ll calculate the fee

Not displaying a list in your premises, or not publishing it on your website or a third party website, is a breach of the publication requirements of the Consumer Rights Act 2015. You could be issued with a financial penalty up to £5000.

Client Money Protection scheme membership 

Under the Client Money Protection Schemes for Property Agents (Requirement to Belong to a Scheme etc.) Regulations 2019, letting agents and property managers who hold client money must belong to a government approved Client Money Protection scheme (CMP scheme).  

See our section on Client Money Protection scheme membership for information on your legal obligations under these regulations.

The Consumer Rights Act 2015 states that, if you have to be a member of a CMP scheme, you must:

  • state you’re a member of a client money protection scheme
  • give the name of the scheme you’re a member of

This information must be displayed with your list of relevant fees:

  • at all of your business premises where you have face to face contact with customers and clients
  • in a place where your customers and clients are likely to see it
  • published on your own website 
  • published on any third-party website, for example if you use a property portal to market your properties, where the property is in England. If this is not possible, you must link to your own website where the information is.

Not displaying this information in your premises, or not publishing it on your website or a third party website, is a breach of the publication requirements of the Consumer Rights Act 2015. You could be issued with a financial penalty up to £5000.

Redress scheme membership 

Under the Redress Schemes for Lettings Agency Work and Property Management Work (Requirement to Belong to a Scheme etc) (England) Order 2014, a person who engages in lettings agency or property management work must be a member of an approved redress scheme for dealing with complaints about that work.  

See our section on redress scheme membership for more information. 

The Consumer Rights Act 2015 states that if you’re required to be a member of a redress scheme, you must:

  • state you’re a member of a redress scheme, and
  • give the name of the scheme 

This information must be displayed with your list of relevant fees:

  • at all of your business premises where you have face to face contact with customers and clients
  • in a place where your customers and clients are likely to see it
  • published on your own website 
  • published on any third-party website, for example if you use a property portal to market your properties, where the property is in England. If this is not possible, you must link to your own website where the information is.

Not displaying this information in your premises, or not publishing it on your website or a third party website, is a breach of the publication requirements of the Consumer Rights Act 2015. You could be issued with a financial penalty up to £5000.

Further guidance

If you’re not sure what information you need to display at your premises and publish online, you can get advice from: 

  • your local authority trading standards service 
  • your professional body or trade association
  • an independent legal adviser